Another suicide note

People hoping for British Labour in Scotland to deserve a revival will read Richard Baker’s offering over at Labour Hame and despair. Baker evinces all the follies and fallacies which have brought the pretendy wee “Scottish Labour Party” to where it now finds itself – languishing in the remaindered bin of Scottish politics.

In the first place, he imagines that there is a “Scottish Labour Party” to be saved. He stubbornly refuses to acknowledge the true subordinate status of British Labour in Scotland. Not a good start for somebody supposedly seeking a way out of its travails.

We’ll gloss over the bit where Baker tries to present Jim Murphy as a unifying figure on the assumption that it is a regrettably discordant attempt at humour.

Of more significance is his attempt to portray the superficial, trivial changes to British Labour in Scotland’s “constitution” as if they were profound and meaningful. I have news for Richard Baker. Adding the word “patriotic” served only to make you look more like Better Together and so remind people of your shameful alliance with the Tories in a truly despicable campaign to deny the sovereignty of Scotland’s people. There is planet-weight unintended and unfunny irony in your use of that word that does not elude others as it evidently does yourself.

The reason for adopting the word “patriotic” is also based on one of the follies and fallacies that I referred to earlier. Richard Baker displays the complete failure to understand the nature of his nemesis when he contemptuously, and erroneously, dismisses the SNP as being “most comfortable” in the territory of national identity rather than progress. I have another bit of news for Richard Baker. The SNP didn’t win the trust of half the electorate by waving a saltire. Or by banging on about how “patriotic” they are. I could explain at length how and why that trust was won. But I’ll settle for two words which, I think, sum up the SNP’s approach and their appeal to voters – principled pragmatism.

But the greatest obstacle of all to Richard Baker being the one to discover a path to redemption for British Labour in Scotland is his fervent British nationalism. His main argument against British Labour in Scotland taking the logical first step on the road to becoming electable is that becoming a genuine Scottish Labour Party would involve sacrificing its status as part of the British establishment.

Avoiding any concessions to the distinctness Scotland’s of Scotland’s political culture takes precedence over even considerations of political survival. The voters have sent British Labour in Scotland an unmistakeable message which says that there is a new political reality in Scotland. Richard Baker responds with the dumb denial that has characterised British Labour in Scotland ever since the SNP’s first Holyrood administration and despite the message being repeated ever more forcibly in 2011 and again last week.

If British Labour in Scotland are listening as intently as they constantly assure us they are, how have they managed to miss that message from the electorate? When the political map of the UK slaps them in eye with the blindingly obvious fact of massive political divergence between Scotland and the rest of the UK, how can they remain so stubbornly oblivious?

If Richard Baker is speaking for British Labour in Scotland then we might as well give up on them completely. They are beyond rehabilitation.

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About Peter A Bell

Thinker. Listener. Talker. Reader. Writer. None of my attitudes are immutable. None of my conclusions are final. None of my opinions are humble.
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